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Workshops

1. Museum environments: managing risk and sustainability
Presented by: Robert Waller (Protect Heritage Corporation) and Jeremy Linden (Image Permanence Institute)

This dynamic and participatory workshop will foster broad perspectives and creative thinking about managing risks and sustainability within collection holding institutions. The goal is to understand the real value of environmental control for collection preservation and to identify opportunities for improved preservation, reduced energy costs, or both simultaneously. It is intended for both recent graduates and mid-career professionals in positions ranging from technical assistance to senior management.
Time: June 25 and 26, 2016, all day
Venue: Botanischer Garten und Botanisches Museum
Fee: € 150



2. Cost-efficient large-scale surface digitizing via photogrammetry – approaches for small and large collections
Presented by: Heinrich Mallison (Museum für Naturkunde, Leibniz Institute for Evolution and Biodiversity Science, Berlin, Germany)

Photogrammetry is a powerful and relatively inexpensive tool for documentation of the appearance and condition of specimens during any step of the curatorial process. The purpose of this workshop is to familiarize participants with the methodology, applications, and products of photogrammetry as it relates to collection, preparation and curation of natural history collections. Also, costs and benefits of various typical scenarios for large-scale collection digitizing will be discussed.
Time: June 25, 2016, all day
Venue: Museum für Naturkunde
Fee: € 65



3. Fluid collections – conservation techniques
Presented by: Dirk Neumann (The Bavarian State Collection of Zoology, Munich, Germany) and Julian Carter (Amgueddfa Cymru - National Museum Wales, Cardiff, Wales)

In 2012 a project was established to develop baseline standards for fluid preserved collections. This workshop will build on the findings of this project by comparing different standards and techniques used or recommended for fluid collections. It will focus on the development and understanding of terminology and the process, with particular reference to the chemistry of wet collections, their fixation and preservation, and the control of deterioration mechanisms. The workshop will combine theoretic concepts with practical collection care and management issues.
Time: June 25, 2016, half day, morning session
Venue: Museum für Naturkunde
Fee: € 50



4. Cleaning – repairing – restoring of historical mounted bird specimens
Presented by: Jürgen Fiebig (Museum für Naturkunde, Leibniz Institute for Evolution and Biodiversity Science, Berlin, Germany)

Selected examples of the largest German bird collection illustrate how badly damaged but valuable exhibits can be preserved and saved. Apart from demonstrating the working steps, repaired and restored exhibits of the Berlin bird collection will be presented and different methods and experiences will be discussed. This three-hour workshop will take place in the new preparation facility of the Museum für Naturkunde and will include a tour into the bird collection. Participants will be provided with handouts including recipes, lists of materials, providers and references.
Time: June 25, 2016, half day, morning session
Venue: Museum für Naturkunde
Fee: € 45



5. "Access and Benefit Sharing" in Natural History Collections – implementation and practical management
Presented by: Dirk Neumann (The Bavarian State Collection of Zoology, Munich, Germany)  and Peter Giere (Museum für Naturkunde, Leibniz Institute for Evolution and Biodiversity Science, Berlin, Germany)

Originally intended as a tool against "biopiracy", Access and Benefit Sharing (ABS) has become a reality over the past years for collection managers and researchers alike. In order to obtain access to specimens in the field, legally binding agreements need to be signed in countries with access legislation and these contracts stipulate the scope of all subsequent utilization of the material collected. The agreements made under ABS need to be carefully observed and have to remain traceable with the respective collection specimens. This workshop looks into the nature of ABS and its origins, the Convention of Biological Diversity and the Nagoya Protocol and provides practical advice for those, who work with specimens collected in signatory countries after 2014.
Time: June 25, 2016, half day, afternoon session
Venue: Museum für Naturkunde
Fee: € 40



6. Proper sealing in fluid collections
Presented by Klaus Wechsler (Bremen, Germany) und Christoph Meier (formerly Naturhistorisches Museum Basel, Switzerland)

Proper sealing of jars in fluid collections is crucial for long term prevention of fluid loss and thus for long term preservation. In a hands on workshop, sealing techniques for different jar types – including an innovative technique for twist off jars – will be presented and participants will get first hand experience in all techniques demonstrated. Jars include twist off jars (including a newly  developed borosilicate version), ground glass stopper jars and jars sealed with bees wax/collophonium or other sealing agents.
Time: June 25, 2016, half day, afternoon session
Venue: Museum für Naturkunde
Fee: € 50



7. SYNTHESYS3 and iDigBio joint workshop on selected tools for automated metadata capture from specimen images

Presented by Inselect, ABBYY & Symbiota

This workshop is jointly hosted by the EU-based SYNTHESYS3 project and the US-based iDigBio project. It will be a mix of informative presentations, practical training and open discussion with an aim to make these tools more accessible to institutes of all sizes. Inselect currently supports automated recognition, cropping and annotation of scanned images of items such as drawers of pinned insects and trays of microscope slides. ABBYY FineReader is an OCR tool which has been found to perform well for specimens, enabling the automated capture of specimen label data. Symbiota is a virtual platform which incorporates OCR, NLP and crowdsourced transcription modules.
Time: June 25, 2016, all day
Venue: Botanischer Garten und Botanisches Museum
Fee: Free
 


!!! This Workshop has been cancelled:

8. Macroscopic imaging of specimens in natural history collections: 2D and 3D representations for research and curation

Presented by Peter Michalik, Marie K. Hörnig (both Zoological Institute and Museum, Greifswald University, Germany) and Peter Giere (Museum für Naturkunde, Leibniz Institute for Evolution and Biodiversity Science, Berlin, Germany)
Supported by the Curator's group of the GfBS

Imaging of collection specimens has become a standard tool for research and curation purposes. However, obtaining a suitable digital representation of a specimen is non-trivial and requires intricate equipment and photographic skills. This workshop looks into different approaches to produce two and three dimensional representations of small to minute specimens of extant and fossil taxa. We will demonstrate how to obtain images using stationary and portable setups. Furthermore, we will give an insight into the post-processing of 2D and also 3D data focusing on workflows using commercial and free software.
Time: June 25, 2016, half day, morning session
Venue: Museum für Naturkunde
Fee: 50 Euros



9. Documentation of environmental samples and eDNA
Presented by Gabi Droege, Jonas Zimmermann (GGBN/Botanic Garden and Botanical Museum Berlin), Dmitry Schigel, Siro Masinde (GBIF)

The GGBN Data Portal has established well working data flows for genomic and ancient DNA samples, including voucher specimens, tissue samples, DNA samples as well as resulting sequences and publications. Environmental DNA information with its thousands of taxa associated with a single sample currently can neither be provided properly for GGBN nor GBIF. In general crosslinks between species occurrences, samples, species evidence based on sequences and links to these sequences are missing on a global scale. In recent years, a number of initiatives have been working towards finding solutions for this problem, e.g., INSDC, GGBN and GBIF. The recently implemented sample-event data publishing standard developed by GBIF and EU BON does not yet adequately cater for publishing metagenomic data. Dealing with different types of DNA (aDNA, gDNA, eDNA) is essential and closely related to user friendly search and display functionalities. The goal of this workshop is to get an overview of existing solutions for environmental samples and associated metadata from other initiatives and portals. We will also present first results of a GBIF/GGBN survey about user requirements for environmental sample data in portals like GBIF and GGBN.
Time: June 20, 2016, half day, morning session
Venue: Botanic Garden and Botanical Museum Berlin
Fee: Free


10. GGI Gardens
Presented by Morgan Gostel and Vicki Funk (National Museum of Natural History)

The Global Genome Initiative (GGI) was founded with the goal of collecting and preserving genome-quality tissue samples from at least one species belonging to each family and 50% of the genera of species on Earth. GGI Gardens was founded in January 2015 by five gardens within the US to collect and preserve specimens from arboreta, botanic gardens, and greenhouses (gardens). Since then, GGI–Gardens has grown considerably through partnership with gardens from around the world greatly expanding the possible number of taxa preserved and continues to expand globally to target, sample, and preserve vouchered plant genomes around the world. The workshop will include a presentation on the progress and future prospects of GGI–Gardens, a training program that will include best practices for GGI–Gardens Member Organizations, a synthesis of what is available globally in gardens, and a question and answer session. We welcome representatives from any arboretum, garden, or greenhouse, as well as herbarium curators interested in how this can impact their efforts. All that are attending GGBN 2016 or SPNHC 2016 may join the workshop and participate in the discussion.
Time: June 20, 2016, half day, afternoon session
Venue: Botanic Garden and Botanical Museum Berlin
Fee: Free


11. Advances in cryopreservation methods for microorganisms and plants
Presented by Charlotte Crahay, Olga Chepurnova, John Day, Wim Vyverman and Annick Wilmotte (Belgian Coordinated Collections of Microorganisms)

Cryopreservation is now considered as the best 'ex situ' preservation approach for microorganisms. However, this is still problematic for some taxonomic groups. The subject of this workshop will be to provide an overview of recent applications of preservation methods to organisms considered as delicate or difficult to preserve. The BCCM/DCG and BCCM/ULC collections of diatoms and cyanobacteria will present results from the BRAIN-be project PRESPHOTO on the cryopreservation of their strains. Participants are welcome to present their data and share their experience with cryopreservation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms and plants.
Time: June 21, 2016, half day, morning session
Venue: Museum für Naturkunde
Fee: Free